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Suggested Humanities Showcase Examples

Page history last edited by Alan Liu 7 years, 12 months ago
This is a storehouse of suggested examples of humanities research (and teaching) for the Humanities Showcase Project.  The goal is to gather examples of humanities work (in blurb and image format) that has public impact or otherwise can contribute to showing the public the value of the humanities.  For the purpose of this showcase, "humanities" is defined flexibly so that there can be overlap with humanities-flavored arts, social science, and other areas. (Since this is only a storehouse, the current web page is not publicly viewable; it is accessible only by members of 4Humanities@UCSB with user permissions on this site.)
Examples gathered here will be vetted by polling the larger 4Humanities@UCSB group (and possibly the larger 4Humanities group as well as non-humanities and non-academic focus groups) for inclusion in outputs from this project.  This is a sort of "you know it when you see it" exercise.  It is hard to define explicitly and in advance what humanities work has the potential to make an impression on the public; so a polling or focus-group vetting process will help.

 

Ref. #

Image

(upload high-res to site; but edit image properties here to make a thumbnail of 150 pixel with maximum

Title & Blurb
Collected by
Date Collected

Permis-

sions if needed?

Priority Rank

(assigned after polling)

1  

World History For Us All

Led by researchers Ross Dunn at San Diego State University and Edmund Burke at UC Santa Cruz (in cooperation with the UCLA National Center for History in the Schools), the “World History For Us All” project makes available a free, publicly available model curriculum adaptable for K-14 world history courses.

Alan Liu
5/2/12
   
2   DigitalOcean
Researchers at the UC Santa Barbara Carsey-Wolf Center for Film, Television, and New Media working on “environmental media” have created the DigitalOcean online network to encourage communities of scientists, educators, students, policy makers, media specialists, ocean enthusiasts, and others to share in producing and learning knowledge about the seas.  Their “Sampling the Sea” Learning Space engages middle and high school students in 200 classrooms around the world in monitoring, analyzing, and sharing information about the declining global fish population.
 
Alan Liu
5/2/12
   
3
 

Mapping the Republic of Letters

Led by researchers Dan Edelstein, Paula Findlen, and Nicole Coleman of Stanford University, Mapping the Republic of Letters is a set of tools that visualizes the early modern "Republic of Letters," an intellectual network initially based on the writing and exchange of letters between scholars from 1500-1800. The project has at its center a multidimensional data set spanning 300 years and over 100,000 letters, travel records, and other documents.

 

Lindsay Thomas
5/3/12
   
   

The Orlando Project

From the project website: "Orlando: Women's Writing in the British Isles is an online cultural history generated from the lives and works of over 1200 writers, and for readers with an interest in literature, women's writing, or cultural history more generally. With almost eight million words of text, it is full of interpretive information on women, writing, and culture. Orlando currently features 1012 British women writers--listed twice in cases of multiple, shifting, or contested nationality--; 13,495 free-standing chronology entries; 25,616 bibliographical listings; 2,438,588 tags; 7,861,990 words (exclusive of tags)."

Lindsay Thomas
5/13/12
   
4

 

 

Narrative HACK

From channelintel, Intel's Youtube channel (link to video above): "The What: The Narrative HACK is a collaboration between Intel Labs, Wieden+Kennedy, PIE and The Oregon Governor's Office of Film & Television. Looking to find new ways to create a narrative.

The Why: Real time rendering of graphics, physics, and story logic is a MASSIVE compute drain, well beyond the capacity of most of the machines consumers have now. Can a new way to tell a narrative streamline this?

The How: Bringing together a talented group of artists, writers, filmmakers, novelists - the Technical and the Creative, we hope to learn and see how to craft stories for technology we use now and what's yet to come."

Cole

Cohen

6/21/12
   
5
 

New Books Network, http://newbooksnetwork.com/

"I appreciated your recent article in Inside Higher Ed on the digital humanities. I wanted to bring to your attention an initiative that bears on your fourth point, about public outreach and service. It's called the "New Books Network" (http://newbooksnetwork.com). The NBN is a consortium of 90 author-interview podcasts on as many topics. The NBN's mission is simple: public education. NBN "channels" are hosted by area-experts, mostly professors in the humanities. All are volunteers. We've published around 700 interviews to date and publish about 15 new ones each week.

 

The good news is that I was recently asked to write a letter of support for one of our hosts who is up for tenure. Another department asked me to write a letter for a guest up for promotion to full professor. So at least some departments are rethinking what "service" means.

 

Warmest, Marshall Poe"

Alan Liu
11/4/12
   
             

 

 

World History For Us All

Led by researchers Ross Dunn at San Diego State University and Edmund Burke at UC Santa Cruz (in cooperation with the UCLA National Center for History in the Schools), the “World History For Us All” project makes available a free, publicly available model curriculum adaptable for K-14 world history courses.

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